Blog: Kubernetes 1.24: Volume Populators Graduate to Beta

Author: Ben Swartzlander (NetApp) The volume populators feature is now two releases old and entering beta! The AnyVolumeDataSouce feature gate defaults to enabled in Kubernetes v1.24, which means that users can specify any custom resource as the data source of a PVC. An earlier blog article detailed how the volume populators feature works. In short, Read more about Blog: Kubernetes 1.24: Volume Populators Graduate to Beta[…]

Blog: Kubernetes 1.24: gRPC container probes in beta

Author: Sergey Kanzhelev (Google) With Kubernetes 1.24 the gRPC probes functionality entered beta and is available by default. Now you can configure startup, liveness, and readiness probes for your gRPC app without exposing any HTTP endpoint, nor do you need an executable. Kubernetes can natively connect to your your workload via gRPC and query its Read more about Blog: Kubernetes 1.24: gRPC container probes in beta[…]

Blog: Storage Capacity Tracking reaches GA in Kubernetes 1.24

Authors: Patrick Ohly (Intel) The v1.24 release of Kubernetes brings storage capacity tracking as a generally available feature. Problems we have solved As explained in more detail in the previous blog post about this feature, storage capacity tracking allows a CSI driver to publish information about remaining capacity. The kube-scheduler then uses that information to Read more about Blog: Storage Capacity Tracking reaches GA in Kubernetes 1.24[…]

Blog: Kubernetes 1.24: Volume Expansion Now A Stable Feature

Author: Hemant Kumar (Red Hat) Volume expansion was introduced as a alpha feature in Kubernetes 1.8 and it went beta in 1.11 and with Kubernetes 1.24 we are excited to announce general availability(GA) of volume expansion. This feature allows Kubernetes users to simply edit their PersistentVolumeClaim objects and specify new size in PVC Spec and Read more about Blog: Kubernetes 1.24: Volume Expansion Now A Stable Feature[…]

Blog: Dockershim: The Historical Context

Author: Kat Cosgrove Dockershim has been removed as of Kubernetes v1.24, and this is a positive move for the project. However, context is important for fully understanding something, be it socially or in software development, and this deserves a more in-depth review. Alongside the dockershim removal in Kubernetes v1.24, we’ve seen some confusion (sometimes at Read more about Blog: Dockershim: The Historical Context[…]

Blog: Increasing the security bar in Ingress-NGINX v1.2.0

Authors: Ricardo Katz (VMware), James Strong (Chainguard) The Ingress may be one of the most targeted components of Kubernetes. An Ingress typically defines an HTTP reverse proxy, exposed to the Internet, containing multiple websites, and with some privileged access to Kubernetes API (such as to read Secrets relating to TLS certificates and their private keys). Read more about Blog: Increasing the security bar in Ingress-NGINX v1.2.0[…]

Blog: Frontiers, fsGroups and frogs: the Kubernetes 1.23 release interview

Author: Craig Box (Google) One of the highlights of hosting the weekly Kubernetes Podcast from Google is talking to the release managers for each new Kubernetes version. The release team is constantly refreshing. Many working their way from small documentation fixes, step up to shadow roles, and then eventually lead a release. As we prepare Read more about Blog: Frontiers, fsGroups and frogs: the Kubernetes 1.23 release interview[…]

Blog: Kubernetes Removals and Deprecations In 1.24

Author: Mickey Boxell (Oracle) As Kubernetes evolves, features and APIs are regularly revisited and removed. New features may offer an alternative or improved approach to solving existing problems, motivating the team to remove the old approach. Old APIs are first deprecated and then removed according to the Kubernetes Deprecation Policy. We want to make sure Read more about Blog: Kubernetes Removals and Deprecations In 1.24[…]

Blog: Is Your Cluster Ready for v1.24?

Author: Kat Cosgrove Way back in December of 2020, Kubernetes announced the deprecation of Dockershim. In Kubernetes, dockershim is a software shim that allows you to use the entire Docker engine as your container runtime within Kubernetes. In the upcoming v1.24 release, we are removing Dockershim – the delay between deprecation and removal in line Read more about Blog: Is Your Cluster Ready for v1.24?[…]